Basil Maze/Herbs For Words
Multi-Purpose Exchange Stations, Signs and Plants
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 2014.

Basil Maze/Herbs For Words
Multi-Purpose Exchange Stations, Signs and Plants
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 2014.

Basil Maze/Herbs For Words
Multi-Purpose Exchange Stations, Signs and Plants
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 2014.



Left: GEEE-cycled self-watering containers and plants made through exchanges;
Right: A record of an exchange of gardening materials for immaterial support and inanimate pleasure.

a G.E.E.E. ledger of the exchanges made
at Hyde Park Art Center in June, 2012

General Economy, Exquisite Exchange (G.E.E.E.),
a post-retail neighborly exchange
Dorchester Projects, 2013

G.E.E.E. Signage (how it works inside)
Dorchester Projects, 2013

Seedlings ready for sale or exchange
Dorchester Projects, 2013

Detail of what a few seeds and seedlings became after one day
Dorchester Projects, 2013

G.E.E.E. Signage (how it works outside)
Dorchester Projects, 2013

General Economy, Exquisite Exchange (G.E.E.E.),
a post-retail museum shop
Hyde Park Art Center 2011-2012

detail of GEEE-cycled furniture
G.E.E.E. may be used for the exchange of information

G.E.E.E. Signage (how it worked inside at HPAC)
on GEEE-cycled table Hyde Park Art Center, 2012

Seeds and plants ready for exchange

Detail of what a few seeds and seedlings became;
on GEEE-cycled furniture Hyde Park Art Center
lobby entrance to G.E.E.E. 2012

G.E.E.E., Union Art Center, Omaha, 2012.

Anything donated to G.E.E.E. is made available for free

General Economy, Exquisite Exchange (G.E.E.E.), 2010,
a post-retail garden shop

General Economy, Exquisite Exchange

Discover how local abundance supports a general economy.

General Economy, Exquisite Exchange (G.E.E.E.) is an ongoing social science experiment that invites communities to establish alternative, post-profit, post-retail sites for the exchange of plants, goods and services based on neighborly values and creative bartering. Exchanged items are available at prices set by neighbors and donated items are available for free. G.E.E.E. evolves organically depending on the surplus and contributions from the community. Through donations of surplus plants from local gardeners, for example, communities in Hyde Park and Omaha worked through G.E.E.E. to plant and establish abundance gardens in neglected landscapes. At the Hyde Park Art Center in 2011 and 2012 the community grew two thousand pounds of tomatoes in homemade containers on the rooftop of the Hyde Park Art Center. Each G.E.E.E. site is constructed from scavenged architectural leftovers and converts under-used spaces into functional trading posts.

Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago (2011-2012). The Union Art Center, Omaha (2012). Dorchester Projects, Chicago (2013).


G.E.E.E.

Press and Scholarship

Keiles, Jamie. “Neiborly-ness, bartering reign supreme at G.E.E.E.’ Chicago Weekly, January 30, 2012. http://blog.chicagoweekly.net/2012/01/30/neighborly-ness-bartering-reign-supreme-at-g-e-e-e/

Ise, Claudine. "Add a Little G.E.E.E. to your garden", Bad at Sports,www.badatsports.com, May 2011.

Nolan, Erika. “Hidden Gems in Hyde Park”, Urban Chiqueness, http://urbanchiqueness.com/chique-tip-best-kept-secrets/

Ritchie, Abraham. Editor Pick: “General Economy, Exquisite Exchange (G.E.E.E.)”, Flavorpill. April 2011.http://flavorpill.com/chicago/events/2011/4/8/general-economy-exquisite-exchange-geee

Quinn, A. Peters. "Exchange Rate". Service Media: Is it "Public Art" or is it Art in a Public Space? Ed. Stuart Keeler. Intro by Carol Becker, Green Lantern Press, 2013. http://imaginativeducation.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/exchange-rate-copy.pdf


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